Monday, July 12, 2021

Essay Structure Made Easy

A thesis statement should be one or two sentences long. It should explain what your essay is about.  It can be in parts, so that it corresponds to the body paragraphs of your essay. It helps to outline your essay before you begin to write it.

The outline might be as follows:

I. Introduction and Thesis--Include the title of the work, the author's name and the year of publication in your introduction. Outline the main ideas of the article. Add a thesis that highlights one or more of the topics in the article that you reacted to. This aspect of the essay should be one paragraph long.

II. Body Paragraphs--Write three body paragraphs, each containing a topic sentence with details that support it. The topic sentence should relate to each part of the thesis. Include quotes from sources to support your claims.

III. Conclusion--Restate your thesis about the issue you are writing about in new words. Summarize the main ideas of the issue you are writing about.

Thursday, July 8, 2021

Critical Race Theory--A Topic that is Evolving

Talking honestly about equality is how a recent CNN article responded to an article about Critical Race theory. As an professor and instructor who has taught courses about diversity, social justice and equal rights, I’ve come to learn about many aspects of Critical Race Theory, or CRT, a topic that has been recently discussed by broadcasters of every persuasion.

CRT in part has to do with the implied meanings of words. For example, I have learned that the word “ladies” was not politically correct because it refers to “women” as “prostitutes” when one uses such expressions of “ladies in the night,” among many other American English expressions. Consider that, today, the words “ladies and gentleman” are no longer appropriate, not only because the term creates a negative impression of women, but also because the expression seemingly gives unequal status them; otherwise, they would be referred to as gentlewomen.

The validity of these teachings is being argued by broadcasters on just about every cable network.These argmements have failed to explain just what CRT is. Critical Race Theory has been taught for decades since the 1960s; however, the post -graduate teachings have evolved from learning the pragmatics, a branch of linguistics that studies implied meanings of words, of contemporary English to a broader study of the impact the Civil Rights movement has had on society and its effect human interactions that relate to culture and race. The focus of teaching now relates to how one can integrate Social Emotional Learning into Common Core. These teachings have been initiated because studies have shown that Social Emotional Learning benefits academic development.

The teachings of CRT include recogizing people who are part of the dominant culture and how other cultures can be subserviant to them. CRT topics include studies of race, power and privilege that have existed in both Eastern and Western civilizations throughout history. Make no mistake about it that open discussions of these issues are an important part of all levels of education because no academic program can function honestly without these discussions.

Tuesday, March 2, 2021

Webliography for Science and Math

Adobe Spark allows educators to create engaging digital media products. https://spark.adobe.com/

5 E Model is for students to engage, explore, explain, elaborate, evaluate when solving science and engineering problems.  https://ngss.sdcoe.net/Evidence-Based-Practices/5E-Model-of-Instruction#

OER commons dot Org is an article reading website, that enhances CALP (academic learning) by extending a topic into several related sub-topics for in-depth learning. https://www.oercommons.org/

Phet Colorado dot Edu provides interactive simulations for math and science. https://phet.colorado.edu/

Flipgrid dot Com is a platform where students can create their own videos of math problems being solved and of science experiments being performed. https://info.flipgrid.com/

Monday, August 10, 2020

The Four Parts of a Critical Response Essay

Critical Response essays stump many students. Consider writing it step by step in four parts.  This type of essay is usually  based upon a reaction you have to a source.

The outline might be as follows:

I. Introduction and Thesis--Include the title of the work, the author's name and the year of publication in your introduction. Outline the main ideas of the article. Add a thesis that highlights one or more of the topics  in the article that you reacted to. This aspect of the essay should be one paragraph long.

II. Summary--Include a summary of the article, along with  the who, what, where, why and how. of it. Consider creating an argument about something mentioned in the essay.  Transition into writing about the article to writing your reaction to a topic discussed in it.  This part of the essay can be one or two paragraphs long.

III. Analysis--Clearly state the  issue that that you are reacting to, so that you can identify what you are writing about in the remainder of the paper. Use quotes from the article and an outside source in order to argue about the issue. This portion can be several paragraphs long.

IV. Conclusion--Restate your thesis about the issue you are writing about in new words. Summarize the main ideas of the issue you are writing about. Synthesize new revelations you can think of about the article.

Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Literature Reviews for Grants and/or Proposals

Literature review structure. 
Many students write literature reviews in their university courses. Literature reviews are a view of the literature that aligns with a selected topic you are writing about.

For example, if you are writing a grant or study proposal to buy Chromebooks for a class in order to create dialog journals (journals where teacher and EL communicate informally) that assist English Learners (ELs) to both acquire and learn English, you would have to describe how this type of communication benefits ELs acquisition and learning of English.

In addition, you would have have to use the literature (sources) you find in a library database to verifying claims for your research study and/or the purchasing of materials for a grant.

Professionals such as Grant Prose Inc and are in business online. Their webpage is very useful if you have any interest in converting a study proposal into a grant.


Wednesday, July 22, 2020

5 Great Free Resources for Online Learning in the Arts


Google Arts and Culture has virtual field trips.

Library of Congress contains films and video of historical events.

PBS Learning Media  brings you standards-aligned videos, interactives, lesson plans, and more.  

New York Times Learning Multimedia to find out what's going on in pictures and graphs. 

Smithsonian Learning Lab includes ways to develop your own interactive learning experiences-or adopt exemplars made by teachers and Smithsonian experts.

Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Six Challenges for English Learners (ELs)


Here are some challenges for English Learners (ELLs) with links for ideas about how to resolve them:

1. Academic language--for some of the best ideas look to Ana Chamot, as she developed CALLA, which is the Cognitive Academic Language Learning Approach. 
2. Idioms and figurative language--The Amelia Bedelia books are great for teaching idioms and figurative language. 

3. Sound/letter correspondence--Phonics is a great subject for teaching sound/letter correspondence. 
4. Sequence of events--Teach the sequence of events using lesson plan for the Very Hungry Caterpillar

5. Cause and effect--Use a multi-flow graphic organizer/thinking map  for cause and effect. 
6. Inferences--Check out good videos about teaching inferences